Videogames: when playing and learning is fun

Spanish version here.

Educational games have existed since the beginning of the computer age. Games whose main purpose is to teach, allowing students to acquire a series of knowledge and skills based on software that allows them to analyze their skills, improve them, and obtain a final result.

But, too often, educational games are too educational. What does this mean? They are very focused on the training component, leaving aside the recreational component. This characteristic of this type of game means that the use of these programs becomes, in many ways, an extension of a math or physics class. We have virtual blackboards, with virtual problems, that are solved as in class: with a virtual chalk, and with a result that is a score of the exercises solved.

This approach is not negative, but it is important to go beyond the idea of creating extensions of a math or physics class. And that’s where games appear that are very similar, if not equal, to any video game we can imagine, but that, inside, contain elements that allow the development of the player’s knowledge. This is called merging player and student, so that both the player and the learner are the same individual.

Many of us have learned through games that, in principle, do not have the official educational label, although we all know that they are. I will give three examples. The Civilization saga would be the first. How much history have we learned from this saga? The second would be the Sim City saga, or its current derivative, Cities: Skylines, where we learn all aspects of a city’s development. And the third one is one that particularly touches me: the flight simulators. How many people who started with the Flight Simulator and other simulators ended up being professional pilots? I know a few of them.

We must look for new sources of learning, based on traditional PC and console games, merged with educational elements. The virtual blackboard is very important, but why stay there? We can create fun, exciting games in three dimensions, with good graphics and sound, which also have an important educational and training component.

That is our mission. And in that task we are involved. Learning without knowing what you are learning. That’s our motto. And we want it to be so for thousands of young people around the world. Thank you very much.

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Math Classroom Challenge Windows/Oculus V.1.40

While we prepare the release of Math Classroom Challenge (Windows/Oculus) on June 7 on Steam, version V.1.40 is on the way, and will be released in a couple of days.

With two new features: until seven Static Math Panels at the same time, and a new Scenario: Seaside Math. This scenario gives the player the opportunity to play in a sunny area with the sea, and even go for a swim. New elements that will enhance this scenario will be available soon.

Nothing like a sunny day with a good math session. Happy math!

Math Street Challenge teaser trailer

This is a teaser trailer of Math Street Challenge. Here you can see some of the features of the game. We’re recording a new video explaining in detail all the elements about configuration of the game. By the way, we’re almost finished the Windows version, more info coming very soon.

The game is now  on preorder at the App Store. The game will be released next Thursday 24.

You can find the manual here.

Math Street Challenge has been approved by Apple

We are happy to inform that Math Street Challenge, our AR game to learn math in the street, has been approved by Apple. We’re now ready to inform about the release date very soon.

Welcome to the real world of gaming. Mixing reality with games is amazing. And we hope you can enjoy it very soon.

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Math Classroom Challenge VR and AR almost ready

We’ve received confirmation from Oculus that the VR version of Math Classroom Challenge has only one issue. We’re working to solve that problem, and the VR version will be ready to go.

Meanwhile, testing is in progress with Math Street Challenge, that is, the Augmented Reality version (AR) of Math Classroom Challenge. Everything is ok and now we’re working to upload the game to the App Store for Apple’s approval.

This short video features Math Street Challenge, a short video where two dynamic math panels are solved, one ok and one with an error. You can see the static panels too, that are solved with the flying numbers. More info and a video coming soon.

 

Reading books in “Book Classroom challenge”

The development of “Book Classroom Challenge” continues, and today we offer an image of what the books will look like. These books will be collected by the player, who can read their first pages if desired. If they enjoy the reading, they’ll be able to continue reading for free, as these are classic books.

In this way the player will be encouraged to learn about quality classical literature by downloading these books free of charge from authorized online platforms, such as the Gutenberg project.

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